Dr. Marilee A. Ramesh

Associate Professor
Department: Biology
Office: 406G Life Science
Phone: 375-2464

ramesh@roanoke.edu

Degrees:

B.S. in Biology, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Ph.D. in Biology, Indiana University

Course List

Research & Teaching Interests:

  • Genetics
  • Genomics
  • Bioinformatics
  • Biology of Food
  • Writing Pedagogy

Scholarly Activities:

MEETING PRESENTATIONS AND PUBLISHED ABSTRACTS
(* designates presenter)

  • K. Boyd, M. Chitnavis and M.A. Ramesh*.  (2013)  Searching for Functional Mobile Elements in Coprinopsis cinerea.  27th Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, CA (poster).

  • M.A. Ramesh*.  (2013)  Why do we study fungi?  27th Fungal Genetics Conference, Genetics Conference Experience, Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, CA (invited oral presentation).

  • M.A. Ramesh*. (2012) Why Teach Writing When We Are Trying to Teach Science? 34th Annual Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (oral presentation).

  • M.A. Ramesh*.  (2011) Applying Writing Pedagogy to College Biology Laboratory Assignments.  26th Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, CA (invited oral presentations and poster).

  • S. Webb and M.A. Ramesh*. (2011) Characterization of Class II DNA Transposons in Coprinopsis cinerea.  26th Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, CA (poster).

  • M.A. Ramesh*, R. Collins, C.S. Lassiter, DB Poli and M. Poore.  (2010)  There’s an App for That: Utilizing iPod Touch Applications  for College Level Biology Instruction.  32nd Annual Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada (oral presentation).

  • M.A. Ramesh*, J.E. Stajich and P.J. Pukkila. (2009) Identification of Repetitive Elements in Coprinus cinereus Genome".  25th Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, CA (poster).

  • D. Greene*, P. Hanstedt*, G. Marsh* and M. Ramesh*. (2009) This is Your Brain on Writing:  James Zull's The Art of Changing the Brain, the Biology of Learning, and Why Writing Teachers Should Care).   60th Annual Convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.

  • M.A. Ramesh*. (2007) Incorporating writing pedagogy into the standard biology term paper. Strategies for Teaching Reading and Writing in Biology Courses.  Selu Conservancy, Radford University, Radford, VA.

  • M.A. Ramesh* and N. Randall. (2007)  Demonstrating the concepts of mutagenesis and geneticscreening using the fungal system Coprinus cinereus.  29th Annual Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY(poster).

  • M.A. Ramesh* and N. Randall. (2007)  Utilizing Coprinus cinereus to demonstrate mutagenesis and genetic screening in an undergraduate laboratory exercise. 24th Fungal Genetics Conference, Pacific Grove, CA (poster).

  • M.A. Ramesh*. (2005) Strategies for Identifying Meiotic Genes in Protists.  East Coast Conference on Protozoology, Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Medicine, Richmond, VA. 

  • M.A. Ramesh*. (2005) Your Genetic Identity:  DNA Privacy Issues.  Invited seminar for Leadership Roanoke Valley; Technology Group Symposium, Roanoke College, Salem, VA.

  • S.B. Malik, A.W. Pightling, Jr., L.M. Stefaniak, A.M. Schurko, M.A. Ramesh, J.M. Logsdon, Jr.* (2005): Insights into the evolution of meiosis from conserved genes in Trichomonas. Annual Meeting of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Program in Evolutionary Biology, Nanaimo BC Canada.

  • M. A. Ramesh*. (2004)  In search of the origins of meiosis:  strategies for identifying meiotic genes in protists.  Invited seminar for the Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (invited oral presentation). 

  • M. A. Ramesh*, S. B. Malik, A. Mt. Castle, E. Reynolds, and J. M. Logsdon, Jr.  (2004) A homology-based approach to isolating spo11 genes from protist sequence databases.  Meiosis Gordon Conference, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH (poster).

  • M. A. Ramesh*, S. B. Malik and J. M. Logsdon. (2001) Elucidating the origins of meiosis: Strategies to isolate meiotic genes from diverse protozoa. FASEB Summer Research Conference-Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangement, Snowmass, CO (poster).
  • M. A. Ramesh*, S. B. Malik and J. M. Logsdon. (2001) Elucidating the origins of meiosis: Strategies to isolate meiotic genes from diverse protozoa. 2001 Annual Meeting of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution, Athens, GA (poster).
  • S. Acharya, M. Celerin, M. Ramesh and M. Zolan. (1999) rad12: a Coprinus cinereus mutant sensitive to radiation and deficient in spore formation. 20th Fungal Genetics Conference, Pacific Grove, CA (poster).
  • M. A. Ramesh and C. P. Woloshuk. (1999) Characterization of afl1 locus in Aspergillus flavus by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Aflatoxin Elimination Workshop, Atlanta, GA.
  • M. A. Ramesh*, A. B. Orth and J. W. Kronstad. (1997) Characterization of the role of the cAMP pathway in vinclozolin resistance of Ustilago maydis. 19th Fungal Genetics Conference, Pacific Grove, CA (poster).
  • M. A. Ramesh*, K. Tang and M. E. Zolan. (1995) Phenotypic analysis and cloning strategy for rad12, a gene required for meiosis and DNA repair in Coprinus cinereus. 18th Fungal Genetics Conference, Pacific Grove, CA (poster).
  • M. A. Ramesh*, K. Tang and M.E. Zolan (1994) Cloning strategy for rad12, a gene of Coprinus cinereus required for meiosis and DNA repair. Fifth International Mycological Congress, Vancouver, British Columbia (poster).
  • M. A. Ramesh*, E.M. Klamo and M.E. Zolan (1993) 100% targeted transformation at the 5D6 locus of Coprinus cinereus. 17th Fungal Genetics Conference, Pacific Grove, CA (poster).
  • M. A. Ramesh*, J. Kirchner and M. Zolan (1992) rad12, a gene required for meiosis and DNA repair in Coprinus cinereus. Gordon Research Conference on Meiosis, Plymouth, NH (poster).
  • M. A. Ramesh*, J. Kirchner and M. Zolan. (1992) rad12, a gene required for meiosis and DNA repair in Coprinus cinereus. The Genetics and Cellular Biology of Basidiomycetes II, Mississauga, Ontario (poster).

Recent Publications:

  • M. Ramesh. (2013) Why Teach Writing When We Are Trying to Teach Science? In Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching, (K. McMahon, Editor).  Proceedings of the 34th Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education.  Proceedings of the 34nd Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education. 34:372-279.

  • M. Ramesh, R. Collins, C. Lassiter, D.B. Poli and M. Poore.  (2011)  There’s an App for That: Utilizing iPod Touch Applications for College Level Biology Instruction.  In Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching, (K. McMahon, Editor).  Proceedings of the 32nd Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education. 32:389-390.

  • J.E. Stajich, S.K. Wilke, D. Ahrén, T.C.H Au, B.W. Birren, M. Borodovsky, C. Burns, B.Canback, L.A. Casselton, B.C.K. Cheng, J. Deng, F.S. Dietrich, D.C. Fargo, M. Farman,A.C. Gathman, J. Goldberg, R. Guigo, P. Hoegger, J.B. Hooker, A. Huggins, T.Y. James, T. Kamad, S. Kilaru, C. Kodira, U. Kues, H. Kawn, W. Li, W.W. Lilly, L. Ma, A.J. Mackey, G. Manning, F. Martin, H. Muraguchi, H. Palmerini, M.A. Ramesh, C. Rehymeyer, N. Shenoy, M. Stanke, A. Tunlid, R. Velagapudi, T.J. Vision, Q. Zeng, M.E. Zolan, and P.J. Pukkila. (2010)  Genome evolution in mushrooms: the complete sequence of the mushroom Coprinopsis cinera (Coprinus cinereus) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 107(26):  11889-11894.

  • M.A. Ramesh and Nicole Randall.  (2008) Demonstrating the concepts of mutagenesis and genetic screening using the fungal system Coprinus cinereus.  In Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching, (editor Kari L. Clase), Proceedings of the 29th Workshop/Conference of the Association of Biology Laboratory Education 29:410-416 . 

  • S-B. Malik, M. A. Ramesh, A. M. Hulstrand & J. M. Logsdon, Jr. (2007) Protist homologs of themeiotic Spo11 and topoisomerase VI reveal an evolutionary history of gene duplication and lineage-specific loss.  Molecular Biology and Evolution 24(12): 2827-2841.

  • M. A. Ramesh, S-B. Malik and J. M. Logsdon, Jr. (2005) A phylogenomic inventory of meiotic genes:  evidence for sex in Giardia and an early eukaryotic origin of meiosis. Current Biology 15(2):185-191.

  1. M. A. Ramesh, R. David Laidlaw, F. Dürrenberger, A. B. Orth and J.W. Kronstad. (2001) The cAMP signal transduction pathway mediates resistance to dicarboximide and aromatic hydrocarbon fungicides in Ustilago maydis.Fungal Genetics and Biology 32:183-193.
  • J. Kronstad, A. De Maria, D. Funnell, R. D. Laidlaw, N. Lee, M. Moniz de Sá and M. Ramesh. (1998) Signaling via cAMP in fungi: Interconnections with mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Archives of Microbiology 170: 395-404.
  • M. A. Ramesh and M. E. Zolan. (1995) Chromosome dynamics in rad12 mutants of Coprinus cinereus. Chromosoma 104:189-201.
  • M. E. Zolan, N.Y. Stassen, M.A. Ramesh, B. C. Lu and G. Valentine. (1994) Meiotic mutants and DNA repair genes of Coprinus cinereus. Canadian Journal of Botany 73:S226- S233.
  • M. E. Zolan, N.K. Heyler and M.A. Ramesh. (1993) Gene mapping using marker chromosomes in Coprinus cinereus. In: R.H. Baltz, G.D. Hegeman and P.L. Skatrud (ed) Industrial Microorganisms: Basic and Applied Molecular Genetics. American Society for Microbiology, Washington DC, USA. pp.31-35.
  • M. A. Ramesh, R. David Laidlaw, F. Dürrenberger, A. B. Orth and J.W. Kronstad. (2001) The cAMP signal transduction pathway mediates resistance to dicarboximide and aromatic hydrocarbon fungicides in Ustilago maydis. Fungal Genetics and Biology 32:183-193.
  • J. Kronstad, A. De Maria, D. Funnell, R. D. Laidlaw, N. Lee, M. Moniz de Sá and M. Ramesh. (1998) Signaling via cAMP in fungi: Interconnections with mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Archives of Microbiology 170: 395-404.
  • M. A. Ramesh and M. E. Zolan. (1995) Chromosome dynamics in rad12 mutants of Coprinus cinereus. Chromosoma 104:189-201.
  • M. E. Zolan, N.Y. Stassen, M.A. Ramesh, B. C. Lu and G. Valentine. (1994) Meiotic mutants and DNA repair genes of Coprinus cinereus. Canadian Journal of Botany 73:S226- S233.
  • M. E. Zolan, N.K. Heyler and M.A. Ramesh. (1993) Gene mapping using marker chromosomes in Coprinus cinereus. In: R.H. Baltz, G.D. Hegeman and P.L. Skatrud (ed) Industrial Microorganisms: Basic and Applied Molecular Genetics. American Society for Microbiology, Washington DC, USA. pp.31-35.

Research Interests:

How does a genome work to orchestra a living organism?  Recent technological advances in the area of genomics and bioinformatics have enabled us to begin to study the whole genome instead of individual genes in isolation.  Not only can we survey the entire genome for our genes of interest, but we can study them in the context of their surroundings.  By studying genetic elements in their natural environment, a new-found appreciation for the non-coding sequences (formerly known as ‘junk DNA’) has immerged.  Rather than the self-serving sequences they were previously thought to be, these non-coding regions are being shown to play major roles in gene regulation, genome stability, and evolution.   

My lab is interested in studying the genome structure and organization of the basidiomycete fungus Coprinopsis cinerea (formerly Coprinus cinereus).  C. cinerea grows as a filamentous fungus that forms fruiting bodies (mushrooms) as a dikaryon.    Within the gills of these fruiting bodies, meiosis occurs in a synchronous fashion regulated by light, a characteristic that makes this organism an ideal model for studying meiosis. My lab is part of the consortium that has sequenced and annotated the genome.  A version the annotated genome is available at http://genome.semo.edu/cgi-bin/gbrowse/cc/.  I am particularly interested in the repetitive elements contained within the genome.   My contribution to the annotation of the C. cinereus genome has focused on identifying and annotating the transposons and retrotransposons.   Several undergraduate researches in my lab have continuing to work on a more detailed characterization of these elements.  We have shown that there are two families of Class I elements and three families of Class II elements. Most of these elements are associated with heterochromatic regions of the genome. 

We are interested in determining whether any of these elements are functional and have developed criteria to assay functionality of these elements.  We are also interested in looking at the variation (family, size and location) of these elements in other strains. Resource provided by a grant from the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) to the consortium is enabling addition strains to be sequenced that can be used in a comparison.