Dr. Edward Nik-Khah

Associate Professor
Department: Business Admin. & Economics
Office: 107 Francis T. West Hall
Phone: 375-4938

nik@roanoke.edu

Degrees:

PhD, University of Notre Dame (Economics)

MA, University of Notre Dame (Economics)

BA, Rockhurst University (Economics, Philosophy, Political Science)

Vita [pdf]

Course List

Research & Teaching Interests:

Edward Nik-Khah has taught at Roanoke College since 2005. During the 2011-2012 academic year Nik-Khah was a research fellow at the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University. A profile discussing his work at the HOPE Center can be found here.

Research Activities
Nik-Khah's research interests include the political economy of market design, post World War II history of economic thought, and science and technology studies.

Market Design

Nik-Khah's research on the field of market design has has sought to bring to light unappreciated intellecutal and practical tensions by examining the uses to which market design has been put. His critical examination of the uses of market design in the US FCC spectrum auctions, "A tale of two auctions" (Journal of Institutional Economics) won him the 2009 K. William Kapp Prize from the European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy. Recent work of his, with Philip Mirowski, "Private Intellectuals and Public Perplexity" (History of Political Economy) has scrutinized the public role market design played during the economic crisis.

History of Economic Thought

Nik-Khah's research on the history of economic thought focuses on the post-World War II Chicago School of Economics, specifically on the rise of Chicago neoliberalism. Topics he has examined include the role of George Stigler as an empire builder at the University of Chicago,  the contretemps surrounding the establishment of the Milton Friedman Institute (now the Becker Friedman Institute), and (with Rob Van Horn) the relationship between Chicago neoliberalism and economics imperialism, with a focus on George Stigler, Aaron Director, and the "freakonomics" of Steven Levitt.

Science and Technology Studies

Recently completed work of Nik-Khah's contributes to understanding the historical emergence of neoliberal science by examining interactions between the Chicago School of Economics and the pharmaceutical industry. Previous work of his (with Philip Mirowski) has critiqued the actor-network notion of "performativity" in (Donald MacKenzie et al, eds.) Do Economists Make Markets?

Courses Taught

History of Economic Thought, Honors Information Age Political Economy, Competition, Monopoly & Public Policy, Experimental Economics, The Economic Role of the Government, Public Finance, Intermediate Microeconomic Theory, Principles of Microeconomics, Introduction to Economics, Rhetorics of Technology

Nik-Khah (along with Philip Mirowski) instructed the course "History of Information and Market Construction in 20th Century Economics" for the Institute for New Economic Thinking's Young Scholars Initiative. A course description is available here.

Recent Publications:

2014.  "Neoliberal Pharmaceutical Science and the Chicago School of Economics." Social Studies of Science, 44(4): 489-517.

2014.  "'Power to the People': A Reply to Healy, Mangin, and Applbaum." Social Studies of Science, 44(4): 524-530.

2013.  “Private Intellectuals and Public Perplexity: The Economics Profession and the Economic Crisis” (with Philip Mirowski). History of Political Economy 45(Supplement): 279-311.

2013.  Review of Masters of the Universe: Hayek, Friedman, and the Birth of Neoliberal Politics by Daniel Stedman Jones. EH.net. November.

2013.  "A Discipline in Trouble." (Review of The Making of the Economy: A Phenomenology of Economic Science by Till Düppe) Journal of Economic Methodology, 20(1): 86-91.

2012.  "Inland Empire: Economics Imperialism as an Imperative of Chicago Neoliberalism." (with Robert Van Horn) Journal of Economic Methodology, 19(3): 259-282.

2011.  "George Stigler, the Graduate School of Business, and the Pillars of the Chicago School," pp. 116-147 in Building Chicago Economics: New Perspectives on the History of America’s Most Powerful Economics Program, Robert Van Horn, Philip Mirowski, and Tom Stapleford, eds. New York: Cambridge University Press.

2011.  “Chicago Neoliberalism and the Genesis of the Milton Friedman Institute (2006-2009),” pp. 368-388 in Building Chicago Economics: New Perspectives on the History of America’s Most Powerful Economics Program, Robert Van Horn, Philip Mirowski, and Tom Stapleford, eds. New York: Cambridge University Press.

2010.  "George J. Stigler,” In The Elgar Companion to the Chicago School of Economics, ed. Ross Emmett, 337-341. Cheltenham, UK: Elgar.

2008.  “Command Performance: Exploring what STS Thinks It Takes to Build a Market.” (with Philip Mirowski) In Living in a Material World: Economic Sociology Meets Science and Technology Studies, ed. Trevor Pinch and Richard Swedberg, 89-128. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

2008.  “A Tale of Two Auctions.” Journal of Institutional Economics, 4(1): 73-97. Winner of the K William Kapp Prize from the European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy

2007.  “Markets Made Flesh: Performativity, and a Problem in Science Studies, augmented with Consideration of the FCC Auctions.” (with Philip Mirowski) In Do Economists Make Markets? On the Performativity of Economics, ed. Donald MacKenzie, Fabian Muniesa, and Lucia Siu, 190-225. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

2006.  “What the FCC Auctions Can Tell Us about the Performativity Thesis.” European Economic Sociology Newsletter, 7(2): 15-21.

Selected Honors and Awards:

Research Fellow, Center for the History of Political Economy, Duke University, 2011-2012

K. William Kapp Prize, European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy, 2009

Faculty Research Year Award, Roanoke College, 2012-2013

Roanoke Faculty Scholar Award, Roanoke College, 2008-2011

Faculty Summer Research Grant, Roanoke College, 2009

Curriculum Development Grant, Roanoke College, 2007

Writing Initiative Grant, Roanoke College, 2006-2008

Graduate Teaching Fellowship, Department of First Year Studies, University of Notre Dame, 2003-2004

Phillip Moore Research Fellowship, Department of Economics, University of Notre Dame, 2002-2003

Outstanding Graduate Student Teacher Award, Kaneb Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Notre Dame, 2001, 2002, 2003

Distinguished Teaching Assistant Award, Department of Economics, University of Notre Dame, 2001, 2003

Excellent Teaching Assistant Award, Department of Economics, University of Notre Dame, 2002